siree

siree
   An emphatic form of ‘sir’, used mainly in North America, usually following the words ‘yes’ and ‘no’. Although the ‘sir’ in expressions like ‘Yes-sirree’, as it is sometimes written, or ‘No sirree’, was clearly of a vocative nature to begin with, it appears to have lost this sense for many speakers. The ‘siree/sirree’ element has become an emphatic suffix converting a simple ‘yes’ into ‘Yes indeed!’ and a ‘No’ into something like ‘Certainly not!’
   In Face to Face, by Edward A. Rogers, a woman says: ‘I can’t say I’m undulating with happiness myself right now. No sir-ee!’ This is spoken to her husband, but one has the strong feeling that she would have used the same expression had she been talking to a woman friend.

A dictionary of epithets and terms of address . . 2015.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • siree — [sə rē′] interj. alt. sp. of SIRREE …   English World dictionary

  • siree — sir|ee [ sɜr i ] noun AMERICAN yes/no siree (Bob) SPOKEN used for emphasizing what you are saying: I d never do that again, no siree …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • siree — UK [sɜːrˈiː] / US [sɜrˈɪ] noun American yes/no siree (Bob) spoken used for emphasizing what you are saying I d never do that again, no siree …   English dictionary

  • siree — interj. (Informal) sir (term used to emphasis after the words yes or no as in Yes Siree ) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • siree — /sɜˈri/ (say ser ree), /səˈri/ (say suh ree) phrase yes siree, Colloquial yes indeed …  

  • siree — variant of sirree * * * siree var. sirree …   Useful english dictionary

  • siree — noun see sirree …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • siree — /seuh ree /, n. (sometimes cap.) sirree. * * * …   Universalium

  • siree — noun Sir. Used as an intensifier, emphatically, after yes or no …   Wiktionary

  • siree — [sɪ ri:] (also sirree) exclamation N. Amer. informal sir (used for emphasis, especially after yes and no). Origin C19: from sir + the emphatic suffix ee …   English new terms dictionary

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